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BOOK REVIEW: ‘Superfuel’

The Washington Times

June 22, 2012

"In my Penn State Beaver campus lectures on energy, I have neglected the terrific advantages of thorium as a nuclear fuel. But, henceforth, this book has convinced me to be negligent no longer."

Science: Richard Martin: Thorium, Super Fuel of the Future

Town Hall Seattle

June 5, 2012

Presented as part of Seattle Science Lectures, with Pacific Science Center and Elliott Bay Book Company.

Thorium Energy

Colorado Public Radio

May 16, 2012

“Once people understand how thorium reactors work," says energy writer Richard Martin, "they realize that almost all of the problems around waste, around safety, around proliferation, and so on, will be solved if we convert our reactor fleet to thorium and build new liquid fueled thorium reactors.”

In Brief: SuperFuel

New Scientist

May 12, 2012

"Energy expert Richard Martin makes the case that thorium, an abundant, safe element that cannot easily be turned into a weapon, should be fuelling our reactors instead of uranium. ... Thorium reactors are not new, and Martin is at his best when describing the human struggles of the cold-war era that spelled their doom."

Richard Martin: Thorium Energy

The David Sirota Show

May 7, 2012

SuperFuel combines science, new historical research, and a gripping business  narrative to tell the untold story of thorium power - and show how we can wean  ourselves off our fossil-fuel addiction, deliver a safe energy source for a  millennia, and avert the risk of nuclear meltdown.

Capsule Review: SuperFuel

Foreign Affairs

May/June 2012

"Today, the governments of China, India, and Japan are developing thorium reactors, as are private-sector players in South Africa and the United Kingdom. Martin urges the United States to get back into the action, since in his view thorium offers the ideal material for satisfying the world’s burgeoning demand for electricity without relying on fossil fuels."

Underreported: Thorium Reactors

The Leonard Lopate Show - WNYC

February 23, 2012

Journalist Richard Martin discusses thorium as a potential nuclear fuel and looks at the efforts to promote it as a new form of green energy.

Safe nuclear: Let the thorium debate begin

Smart Planet

May 11, 2012

In a 20-minute segment on a National Public Radio show hosted by NPR’s Ira Flatow, Makhijani grilled one of thorium’s most visible supporters, author Richard Martin, who has just written a book called SuperFuel, due out in June from Palgrave MacMillan.

Is Thorium a Magic Bullet for Our Energy Problems?

Science Friday - NPR

May 4, 2012

As the search for cheap, safe and non-carbon emitting sources of energy continues, a band of scientists say the answer may be nuclear reactors fueled by thorium. Others caution that thorium reactors pose waste and proliferation risks. Ira Flatow and guests discuss the pros and cons of thorium reactors.

Books That Matter: SuperFuel

Matter Network

May 24, 2012

As the world searches for cheap, non-carbon-emitting energy sources, thorium is reemerging as an overlooked solution that could provide hundreds of years of clean, safe power. As one of the first energy experts to promote the development of thorium, award-winning science writer Richard Martin combines science, new historical research, and a gripping business narrative to tell the untold story of thorium power – and show how we can wean ourselves off our fossil-fuel addiction, deliver a safe energy source for a millennia, and avert the risk of catastrophic climate change.

Safe nuclear: Let the thorium debate begin

Smart Planet

May 11, 2012

In a 20-minute segment on a National Public Radio show hosted by NPR’s Ira Flatow, Makhijani grilled one of thorium’s most visible supporters, author Richard Martin, who has just written a book called SuperFuel, due out in June from Palgrave MacMillan.

Power for the Future

New Scientist

May 12, 2012

Thorium reactors are not new,  and Martin is at his best when describing the human struggles of the cold-war era that spelledtheir doom -most notably the battle between physicist Alvin Weinberg, a diplomatic thorium proponent, and Hyman Rickover, a navy admiral intent on preserving uranium’s dominance to further his military ambitions